Fix Windows 10 install stuck at “Getting Ready”

If you ever see a Windows 10 install getting stuck at “Getting Ready”–the issue could be caused by various factors.  Below are some tips to help you fix this issue along with other tips for other kinds of installation related errors.

1. UEFI booted installation — disable secure boot and enable “Legacy Booting”. When you insert the USB or DVD installation, make sure to select “legacy boot option in boot devices list of your laptop or desktop”.  If you see HP, Dell or other logos when you are booting up Windows 10 instead of the Win10 logo, that is a sign something is off (this only applies to clean install, if you are upgrading–you may still see the logo of your computer manufacturer.)  The UEFI bootloader–booting up your USB installer is the culprit of the installation getting stuck in that “Getting ready”.   If you ever shut it down when it is stuck in that “getting ready”, you will see that installation has failed error and to restart installation again.  Once you ensure that legacy booting is enabled in BIOS, you need to hit ESC or F9,F12 or whatever key shows you the boot devices list so that you can select the regular legacy boot and not the UEFI boot option for your thumb drive.

2.  If your Windows 10 install gets stuck on “Getting Updates”–it may actually be using a slow internet and not stuck at all.  Make sure you are using a fast internet or you could always just install without the “Get updates” option during the upgrade installation.

3.  If you get other installation errors, make sure to disconnect all peripherals aside from mouse and keyboard.

4.  Instead of using the Windows Update service inside Windows got upgrade from Windows 7, 8 or 8.1 to 10.  You could just download the Media Creation Tool found here https://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/software-download/windows10ISO

5.  If the Media creation tool is not working for you, it usually means your USB flash drive may not have enough space on it.  You can try running the media creation tool in admin mode by right clicking and clicking on “Run as Administrator”.   Make sure your thumb drive is not locked.  Try a different flash drive if it still keeps failing at writing to the USB after it has downloaded the Win10 ISO.  Make sure to choose the right version for your system architecture, most new systems will be 64 bit.

6.  If after you install Windows 10 and it gets stuck on “Working on it”– Go to control panel and then Windows Update.   Click on check “check for updates”.  Let it take however long it wants for the update, and it should show you the upgrade option.

The Differences Between SAN and NAS

Storage Area Networks (SANs) and Network Attached Storage (NAS) both provide networked storage solutions. A NAS is a single storage device that operates on data files, while a SAN is a local network of multiple devices.

The differences between NAS and SAN can be seen when comparing their cabling and how they’re connected to the system, as well as how communication to the device occurs.

SAN vs. NAS Technology

A NAS unit includes a dedicated hardware device that connects to a local area network, usually through an Ethernet connection.

This NAS server authenticates clients and manages file operations in much the same manner as traditional file servers, through well-established network protocols.

To reduce the costs that occur with traditional file servers, NAS devices generally run an embedded operating system on simplified hardware and lack peripherals like a monitor or keyboard.

A SAN commonly utilizes Fibre Channel interconnects and connects a set of storage devices that are able to share data with one another.

SAN vs. NAS Usage Models

The administrator of a home or small business network can connect one NAS device to their local area network. The NAS maintains its own IP address comparable to computers and other TCP/IP devices. Using a software program that is provided with the NAS hardware, the network administrator can set up automatic or manual backups and file copies between the NAS and all the other connected devices.

The NAS holds many gigabytes or terabytes of data. Administrators can add additional storage capacity to their network by installing additional NAS devices, although each NAS operates independently.

Administrators of large enterprise networks may require many terabytes of centralized file storage or extremely high-speed file transfer operations.

Where installing an army of many NAS devices is not a practical option, administrators can instead install a SAN containing a high-performance disk array to provide the needed scalability and performance.

SAN/NAS Convergence

As internet technologies like ​TCP/IP and Ethernet have proliferated worldwide, some SAN products are making the transition from Fibre Channel to the same IP-based approach NAS uses. Also, with the rapid improvements in disk storage technology, today’s NAS devices now offer capacities and performance that once were only possible with SAN.

These two industry factors have led to a partial convergence of NAS and SAN approaches to network storage.